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Protocol for a systematic review of the efficacy of epidermal grafting for wound healing

Kanapathy, M; Smith, OJ; Hachach-Haram, N; Bystrzonowski, N; Mosahebi, A; Richards, T; (2016) Protocol for a systematic review of the efficacy of epidermal grafting for wound healing. Systematic Reviews , 5 , Article 92. 10.1186/s13643-016-0268-7. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Autologous skin grafting is an important modality for wound coverage; however, it can result in donor site morbidity. Epidermal grafting is an emerging option to overcome this challenge. Furthermore, it can be done in an outpatient setting with minimal or no pain. To date, the evidence on the efficacy of this technique for wound healing has yet to be outlined. We aim to synthesise the current evidence on epidermal grafting for wound healing to establish the efficacy of this technique. METHODS/DESIGN: We will conduct a comprehensive search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (up to May 2016) to identify studies on epidermal grafting for wound healing. We will include any primary studies (excluding case reports or case series lesser than three patients) or systematic reviews of such studies to assess the outcome of epidermal grafting for wound healing either on its own or compared to other methods. The expected primary outcome measures are the efficacy of epidermal grafting for wound healing (measured by the proportion of wounds healed at 6 weeks) and the mean wound-healing time (time for complete re-epithelialisation). Secondary outcome measures are the mean donor site-healing time, need for anaesthesia, costs associated with resource use, health-related quality of life, and proportion of patients with adverse event. Subgroup analysis will be performed for the proportions of wounds healed based on wound aetiology. DISCUSSION: This is a timely systematic review, and the finding of this systematic review is expected to guide research and clinical practice aimed at improving wound care. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42016033051.

Type: Article
Title: Protocol for a systematic review of the efficacy of epidermal grafting for wound healing
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13643-016-0268-7
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-016-0268-7
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Epidermal graft, Skin graft, Systematic review, Wound healing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1498713
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