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Emotional stability, conscientiousness, and self-reported hypertension in adulthood

Cheng, H; Montgomery, S; Treglown, L; Furnham, A; (2017) Emotional stability, conscientiousness, and self-reported hypertension in adulthood. Personality and Individual Differences , 115 pp. 159-163. 10.1016/j.paid.2016.02.034. Green open access

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Abstract

This study aimed to investigate social and psychological factors in childhood and adulthood associated with self-reported hypertension in adulthood. Using data from the National Child Development Study, a nationally representative sample of 17,415 babies born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 11, 33, and 50 years of age. Self-reported diagnosed hypertension by 50 years was the outcome measure. In total, 5753 participants with complete data on parental social class at birth, childhood cognitive ability test scores at 11 years, educational qualifications at 33 years, personality traits, occupational levels, and self-reported hypertension (all measured at age 50 years) were included in the study. Using logistic regression analyses, results showed that sex (OR = 0.60: 0.49–0.73, p < .001), educational qualifications (OR = 0.59: 0.37–0.92, p < .05), and traits emotional stability (OR = 0.84: 0.77–0.91, p < .001) and conscientiousness (OR = 0.89: 0.82–0.98, p < .05) were all significantly associated with the occurrence of self-reported hypertension in adulthood. Both psychological factors and socio-demographic factors were significantly associated with self-reported hypertension in adulthood.

Type: Article
Title: Emotional stability, conscientiousness, and self-reported hypertension in adulthood
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2016.02.034
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.02.034
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Social Sciences, Psychology, Social, Psychology, Self-reported hypertension, Educational qualifications, Traits Emotional Stability and Conscientiousness, Cross-sectional and longitudinal, BLOOD-PRESSURE, LIFE-STYLE, PERSONALITY, MORTALITY, STRESS, HEALTH, MEN, NEUROTICISM, COHORT, RISK
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1497305
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