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Birthweight, childhood growth and left ventricular structure at age 60-64 years in a British birth cohort study

Hardy, R; Ghosh, A; Deanfield, J; Kuh, DJL; Hughes, A; (2016) Birthweight, childhood growth and left ventricular structure at age 60-64 years in a British birth cohort study. International Journal of Epidemiology , 45 (4) pp. 1091-1102. 10.1093/ije/dyw150. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: High left ventricular mass (LVM) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and mortality, but information relating LVM in older age to growth in early life is limited. We assessed the relationship of birthweight, height and body mass index (BMI) and overweight across childhood and adolescence with later life left ventricular (LV) structure. METHODS: We used data from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) on men and women born in 1946 in Britain and followed up ever since. We use regression models to relate prospective measures of birthweight and height and BMI from ages 2–20 years to LV structure at 60–64 years. RESULTS: Positive associations of birthweight with LVM and LV end diastolic volume (LVEDV) at 60–64 years were largely explained by adult height. Higher BMI, greater changes in BMI and greater accumulation of overweight across childhood and adolescence were associated with higher LVM and LVEDV and odds of concentric hypertrophy. Those who were overweight at two ages in early life had a mean LVM 11.5 g (95% confidence interval: -2.19,24.87) greater, and a mean LVEDV 10.0 ml (3.7,16.2) greater, than those who were not overweight. Associations were at least partially mediated through adult body mass index. Body size was less consistently associated with relative wall thickness (RWT), with the strongest association being observed with pubertal BMI change [0.007 (0.001,0.013) per standard deviation change in BMI 7–15 years]. The relationships between taller childhood height and LVM and LVEDV were explained by adult height. CONCLUSIONS: Given the increasing levels of overweight in contemporary cohorts of children, these findings further emphasize the need for effective interventions to prevent childhood overweight.

Type: Article
Title: Birthweight, childhood growth and left ventricular structure at age 60-64 years in a British birth cohort study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyw150
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyw150
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: birth weight, growth, overweight, left ventricular structure, birth cohort, life course
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1497152
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