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Roles for Personal Informatics in Chronic Pain

Felipe, S; Singh, A; Bradley, C; Williams, ACDC; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; (2015) Roles for Personal Informatics in Chronic Pain. In: Proceedings of the 2015 9th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare (PervasiveHealth). (pp. pp. 161-168). IEEE: Istanbul, Turkey. Green open access

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Abstract

Self-management of chronic pain is a complex and demanding activity. Multidisciplinary pain management programs are designed to provide patients with the skills to improve, maintain functioning and self-manage their pain but gains diminish in the long-term due to lack of support from clinicians. Sensing technology can be a cost-effective way to extend support for self-management outside clinical settings but they are currently under-explored. In this paper, we report studies carried out to investigate how Personal Informatics Systems (PIS) based on wearable body sensing technology could facilitate pain self-management and functioning. Five roles for PIS emerged from a qualitative study with people with chronic pain and physiotherapists: (i) assessment, planning and prevention (ii) a direct supervisory and co-management role, (iii) facilitating deeper understanding, (iv) managing emotional states, and (v) sharing for social acceptability. A web-based survey was conducted to understand the parameters that should be tracked to support self-management and what tracked information should be shared with others. Finally, we suggest an extension to previous PIS models and propose design implications to address immediate, short-term and long-term information needs for personal use of people with chronic pain and for sharing with others. / Note: As originally published there is an error in the document. The following information was omitted by the authors: "The project was funded by the EPSRC grant Emotion & Pain Project EP/H017178/1 rather than the EPSRC grant EP/G043507/1: Pain rehabilitation: E/Motion-based automated coaching.." The article PDF remains unchanged.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Roles for Personal Informatics in Chronic Pain
Event: 2015 9th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare (PervasiveHealth)
Location: Bogazici Univ, Istanbul, TURKEY
Dates: 20 May 2015 - 23 May 2015
ISBN-13: 9781631900457
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015.259501
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015....
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2015 ICST. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from ICST must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.
Keywords: personal informatics, Chronic pain, quantified-self, self- management, physiological sensing, emotional wellbeing, wearables
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > UCL Interaction Centre
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1496414
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