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The Host Immune Response to Tissue-Engineered Organs: Current Problems and Future Directions

Wiles, K; Fishman, JM; De Coppi, P; Birchall, MA; (2016) The Host Immune Response to Tissue-Engineered Organs: Current Problems and Future Directions. Tissue Engineering Part B: Reviews , 22 (3) pp. 208-219. 10.1089/ten.teb.2015.0376. Green open access

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Abstract

As the global health burden of chronic disease increases, end-stage organ failure has become a costly and intractable problem. De novo organ creation is one of the long-term goals of the medical community. One of the promising avenues is that of tissue engineering: the use of biomaterials to create cells, structures, or even whole organs. Tissue engineering has emerged from its nascent stage, with several proof-of-principle trials performed across various tissue types. As tissue engineering moves from the realm of case trials to broader clinical study, three major questions have emerged: (1) Can the production of biological scaffolds be scaled up accordingly to meet current and future demands without generating an unfavorable immune response? (2) Are biological scaffolds plus or minus the inclusion of cells replaced by scar tissue or native functional tissue? (3) Can tissue-engineered organs be grown in children and adolescents given the different immune profiles of children? In this review, we highlight current research in the immunological response to tissue-engineered biomaterials, cells, and whole organs and address the answers to these questions.

Type: Article
Title: The Host Immune Response to Tissue-Engineered Organs: Current Problems and Future Directions
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1089/ten.teb.2015.0376
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1089/ten.teb.2015.0376
Language: English
Additional information: © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.teb.2015.0376.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Cell & Tissue Engineering, Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology, Cell Biology, prevent xenograft rejection, islet-cell transplantation, proof-of-concept, delta-t-cell, in-vivo, regenerative medicine, extracellular-matrix, neonatal desensitization, macrophage phenotype, clinical-application
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1496166
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