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Differentiating drusen: Drusen and drusen-like appearances associated with ageing, age-related macular degeneration, inherited eye disease and other pathological processes

Khan, KN; Mahroo, OA; Khan, RS; Mohamed, MD; McKibbin, M; Bird, A; Michaelides, M; ... Moore, AT; + view all (2016) Differentiating drusen: Drusen and drusen-like appearances associated with ageing, age-related macular degeneration, inherited eye disease and other pathological processes. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research , 53 pp. 70-106. 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2016.04.008. Green open access

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Abstract

Drusen are discussed frequently in the context of their association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Some types may, however, be regarded as a normal consequence of ageing; others may be observed in young age groups. They also occur in a number of inherited disorders and some systemic conditions. Whilst drusen are classically located external (sclerad) to the retinal pigment epithelium, accumulations of material internal (vitread to) this layer can display a drusen-like appearance, having been variously termed pseudodrusen or subretinal drusenoid deposits. This review first briefly presents an overview of drusen biogenesis and subclinical deposit. The (frequently overlapping) subtypes of clinically detectable deposit, seen usually in the context of ageing or AMD, are then described in more detail, together with appearance on imaging modalities: these include hard and soft drusen, cuticular drusen, reticular pseudodrusen and “ghost drusen”. Eye disorders other than AMD which may exhibit drusen or drusen-like features are subsequently discussed: these include monogenic conditions as well as conditions with undefined inheritance, the latter including some types of early onset drusen such as large colloid drusen. A number of systemic conditions in which drusen-like deposits may be seen are also considered. Throughout this review, high resolution images are presented for most of the conditions discussed, particularly the rarer ones, providing a useful reference library for images of the range of conditions associated with drusen-like appearances. In the final section, some common themes are highlighted, as well as a brief discussion of some future avenues for research.

Type: Article
Title: Differentiating drusen: Drusen and drusen-like appearances associated with ageing, age-related macular degeneration, inherited eye disease and other pathological processes
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2016.04.008
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.preteyeres.2016.04.008
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016. This manuscript version is published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This licence allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0. Access may be initially restricted by the publisher.
Keywords: Retinal drusen; Macular degeneration; Retinal dystrophy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1494353
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