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Mini-Review: Limbal Stem Cells Deficiency in Companion Animals: Time to Give Something Back?

Sanchez, RF; Daniels, JT; (2016) Mini-Review: Limbal Stem Cells Deficiency in Companion Animals: Time to Give Something Back? Current Eye Research , 41 (4) pp. 425-432. 10.3109/02713683.2015.1056801. Green open access

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Daniels_Fig 1 Corneal swirl in a brachycephalic dog with trichiasis.JPG

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Daniels_Fig 2 Young Pug with a mild early form of Pigmentary Keratitis-Keratopathy and pigment swirl.JPG

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Daniels_Fig 3 Pigmentary Keratitis-keratopahty in a Pug obscuring the medial to central cornea.JPG

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Daniels_Fig 4A Lymphocytic plasmacytic keratitis in an 8 yr old Male GS dog OU.JPG

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Daniels_Fig 4B partial resolution of lymphocytic plasmacytic keratitis in a GS dog after treatment with a topical steroid for 4 weeks.JPG

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Abstract

Experimental animals have been used extensively in the goal of developing sight-saving therapies for humans. One example is the development of transplantation of cultured limbal epithelial stem cells (LESC) to restore vision following ocular surface injury or disease. With clinical trials of cultured LESC therapy underway in humans and a potential companion animal population suffering from similar diseases, it is perhaps time to give something back. Comparatively to humans, what is known about the healthy limbus and corneal surface physiology of companion animals is still very little. Blinding corneal diseases in animals such as symblepharon in cats with Feline Herpes Virus-1 infections require a basic understanding of the functional companion animal limbus and corneal stem cells. Our understanding of many other vision threatening conditions such as scarring of the cornea post-inflammation with lymphocytic-plasmacytic infiltrate in dogs (aka chronic superficial keratitis) or pigment proliferation with Pigmentary Keratitis of Pugs would benefit from a better understanding of the animal cornea in health and disease. This is also vital when new therapeutic approaches are considered. This review will explore the current challenges and future research directions that will be required to increase our understanding of corneal diseases in animals and consider the potential development and delivery of cultured stem cell therapy to veterinary ocular surface patients.

Type: Article
Title: Mini-Review: Limbal Stem Cells Deficiency in Companion Animals: Time to Give Something Back?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3109/02713683.2015.1056801
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02713683.2015.1056801
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Current Eye Research on 19 August 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/02713683.2015.1056801.
Keywords: cat, cornea, dog, limbus, stem cell
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1494211
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