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Effects of language experience on pre-categorical perception: Distinguishing general from specialized processes in speech perception

Iverson, P; Wagner, A; Rosen, S; (2016) Effects of language experience on pre-categorical perception: Distinguishing general from specialized processes in speech perception. Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America , 139 (4) pp. 1799-1809. 10.1121/1.4944755. Green open access

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Abstract

Cross-language differences in speech perception have traditionally been linked to phonological categories, but it has become increasingly clear that language experience has effects beginning at early stages of perception, which blurs the accepted distinctions between general and speech-specific processing. The present experiments explored this distinction by playing stimuli to English and Japanese speakers that manipulated the acoustic form of English /r/ and /l/, in order to determine how acoustically natural and phonologically identifiable a stimulus must be for cross-language discrimination differences to emerge. Discrimination differences were found for stimuli that did not sound subjectively like speech or /r/ and /l/, but overall they were strongly linked to phonological categorization. The results thus support the view that phonological categories are an important source of cross-language differences, but also show that these differences can extend to stimuli that do not clearly sound like speech.

Type: Article
Title: Effects of language experience on pre-categorical perception: Distinguishing general from specialized processes in speech perception
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1121/1.4944755
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4944755
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Acoustical Society of America. The following article appeared in J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 139, 1799 (2016) and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4944755. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and AIP Publishing.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Speech, Hearing and Phonetic Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1493741
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