UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Modulation of motivational salience processing during the early stages of psychosis

Smieskova, R; Roiser, JP; Chaddock, CA; Schmidt, A; Harrisberger, F; Bendfeldt, K; Simon, A; ... Borgwardt, S; + view all (2015) Modulation of motivational salience processing during the early stages of psychosis. Schizophrenia Research , 166 (1-3) pp. 17-23. 10.1016/j.schres.2015.04.036. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Smieskova_modulation_of_motivational_salience_processing.pdf

Download (641kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background Deficits in motivational salience processing have been related to psychotic symptoms and disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. We aimed at exploring changes in salience processing and brain activity during different stages of psychosis and antipsychotic medication effect. Methods We used fMRI during the Salience Attribution Task to investigate hemodynamic differences between 19 healthy controls (HCs), 34 at-risk mental state (ARMS) individuals and 29 individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP), including a subgroup of 17 FEP without antipsychotic medication (FEP-UM) and 12 FEP with antipsychotic medication (FEP-M). Motivational salience processing was operationalized by brain activity in response to high-probability rewarding cues (adaptive salience) and in response to low-probability rewarding cues (aberrant salience). Results Behaviorally, adaptive salience response was not accelerated in FEP, although they correctly distinguished between trials with low and high reward probability. In comparison to HC, ARMS exhibited a lower hemodynamic response during adaptive salience in the right inferior parietal lobule and FEP-UM in the left dorsal cingulate gyrus. The FEP-M group exhibited a lower adaptive salience response than HC in the right insula and than ARMS in the anterior cingulate gyrus. In unmedicated individuals, the severity of hallucinations and delusions correlated negatively with the insular- and anterior cingulate hemodynamic response during adaptive salience. We found no differences in aberrant salience processing associated with behavior or medication. Conclusion The changes in adaptive motivational salience processing during psychosis development reveal neurofunctional abnormalities in the somatosensory and premotor cortex. Antipsychotic medication seems to modify hemodynamic responses in the anterior cingulate and insula.

Type: Article
Title: Modulation of motivational salience processing during the early stages of psychosis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2015.04.036
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2015.04.036
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Psychiatry, Functional MRI, Antipsychotic medication, Cingulate cortex, Insula, STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY, STRIATAL REWARD PREDICTION, RISK MENTAL STATES, ANTIPSYCHOTIC TREATMENT, SCHIZOPHRENIC-PATIENTS, ABERRANT SALIENCE, 1ST-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA, SUSTAINED ATTENTION, BRAIN ACTIVATION, DEFAULT-MODE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1490600
Downloads since deposit
30Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item