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Trajectories of childhood neighbourhood cohesion and adolescent mental health: evidence from a national Canadian cohort.

Kingsbury, M; Kirkbride, JB; McMartin, SE; Wickham, ME; Weeks, M; Colman, I; (2015) Trajectories of childhood neighbourhood cohesion and adolescent mental health: evidence from a national Canadian cohort. Psychological Medicine , 45 (15) pp. 3239-3248. 10.1017/S0033291715001245. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to examine associations between trajectories of childhood neighbourhood social cohesion and adolescent mental health and behaviour. METHOD: This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, a nationally representative sample of Canadian children. The sample included 5577 children aged 0-3 years in 1994-1995, prospectively followed until age 12-15 years. Parental perceived neighbourhood cohesion was assessed every 2 years. Latent growth class modelling was used to identify trajectories of neighbourhood cohesion. Mental health and behavioural outcomes were self-reported at age 12-15 years. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between neighbourhood cohesion trajectories and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: Five distinct trajectories were identified: 'stable low' (4.2%); 'moderate increasing' (9.1%); 'stable moderate' (68.5%); 'high falling' (8.9%); and 'stable high' (9.3%). Relative to those living in stable moderately cohesive neighbourhoods, those in stable low cohesive neighbourhoods were more likely to experience symptoms of anxiety/depression [odds ratio (OR) = 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-2.90] and engage in indirect aggression (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.07-2.45). Those with improvements in neighbourhood cohesion had significantly lower odds of hyperactivity (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.98) and indirect aggression (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96). In contrast, those with a decline in neighbourhood cohesion had increased odds of hyperactivity (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.21-2.29). Those in highly cohesive neighbourhoods in early childhood were more likely to engage in prosocial behaviour ('high falling': OR = 1.93, 95% CI 1.38-2.69; 'stable high': OR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.35-2.63). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that neighbourhood cohesion in childhood may have time-sensitive effects on several domains of adolescent mental health and behaviour.

Type: Article
Title: Trajectories of childhood neighbourhood cohesion and adolescent mental health: evidence from a national Canadian cohort.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291715001245
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291715001245
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Behaviour problems, mental health, neighbourhood cohesion, social environment, youth
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1488652
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