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Resting-State Coupling between Core Regions within the Central-Executive and Salience Networks Contributes to Working Memory Performance

Fang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhou, Y; Cheng, L; Li, J; Wang, Y; Friston, KJ; (2016) Resting-State Coupling between Core Regions within the Central-Executive and Salience Networks Contributes to Working Memory Performance. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience , 10 , Article 27. 10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00027. Green open access

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Abstract

Previous studies investigated the distinct roles played by different cognitive regions and suggested that the patterns of connectivity of these regions are associated with working memory (WM). However, the specific causal mechanism through which the neuronal circuits that involve these brain regions contribute to WM is still unclear. Here, in a large sample of healthy young adults, we first identified the core WM regions by linking WM accuracy to resting-state functional connectivity with the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dLPFC; a principal region in the central-executive network, CEN). Then a spectral dynamic causal modeling (spDCM) analysis was performed to quantify the effective connectivity between these regions. Finally, the effective connectivity was correlated with WM accuracy to characterize the relationship between these connections and WM performance. We found that the functional connections between the bilateral dLPFC and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and between the right dLPFC and the left orbital fronto-insular cortex (FIC) were correlated with WM accuracy. Furthermore, the effective connectivity from the dACC to the bilateral dLPFC and from the right dLPFC to the left FIC could predict individual differences in WM. Because the dACC and FIC are core regions of the salience network (SN), we inferred that the inter- and causal-connectivity between core regions within the CEN and SN is functionally relevant for WM performance. In summary, the current study identified the dLPFC-related resting-state effective connectivity underlying WM and suggests that individual differences in cognitive ability could be characterized by resting-state effective connectivity.

Type: Article
Title: Resting-State Coupling between Core Regions within the Central-Executive and Salience Networks Contributes to Working Memory Performance
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00027
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00027
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Fang, Zhang, Zhou, Cheng, Li, Wang, Friston and Jiang. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, effective connectivity, functional connectivity, resting state fMRI, spectral dynamic causal modeling, working memory
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1486180
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