UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Anhedonia is associated with blunted reward sensitivity in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression

Liu, WH; Roiser, JP; Wang, LZ; Zhu, YH; Huang, J; Neumann, DL; Shum, DH; ... Chan, RC; + view all (2016) Anhedonia is associated with blunted reward sensitivity in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. Journal of Affective Disorders , 190 pp. 640-648. 10.1016/j.jad.2015.10.050. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Roiser_Anhedona in relatives of MDD patients.pdf

Download (386kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Anhedonia is a cardinal feature of major depression and is hypothesized to be driven by low motivation, in particular blunted reward sensitivity. It has been suggested to be a marker that represents a genetic predisposition to this disorder. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heightened risk in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. We previously demonstrated abnormal reward biases in acutely depressed patients. The present study aimed to examine the development of reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. METHODS: Forty-seven first-degree relatives of patients with major depression (26 females, age 18-52) and 60 healthy controls with no family history of depression (34 females, age 21-48) were recruited. A probabilistically rewarded difficult visual discrimination task, in which participants were instructed about the contingencies, was used to assess blunted reward sensitivity. A response bias towards the more frequently rewarded stimulus (termed "reward bias") was the primary outcome variable in this study. Participants also completed self-reported measures of anhedonia and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, relatives of patients with major depression with sub-clinical depressive symptoms displayed a blunted reward bias. Relatives without symptoms displayed largely intact motivational processing on both self-report and experimental measures. The degree of anhedonia was associated with attenuated reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression, especially in those with sub-clinical symptoms. LIMITATIONS: The study did not include a depressed patient group, which restricted our ability to interpret the observed group differences. CONCLUSIONS: Blunted reward sensitivity may be largely manifested in a subgroup of relatives with high levels of depressive symptoms.

Type: Article
Title: Anhedonia is associated with blunted reward sensitivity in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2015.10.050
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2015.10.050
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016. This manuscript version is published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This licence allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0.
Keywords: Anhedonia, Depression, Reward, Risk factors
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1483278
Downloads since deposit
179Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item