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Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease

Oswal, A; Beudel, M; Zrinzo, L; Limousin, P; Hariz, M; Foltynie, T; Litvak, V; (2016) Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease. Brain , 139 (5) pp. 1482-1496. 10.1093/brain/aww048. Green open access

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Abstract

Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the possibility that cortical connectivity with the subthalamic nucleus in the high and low beta bands may reflect coupling mediated predominantly by the hyperdirect and indirect pathways to subthalamic nucleus, respectively, and that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation predominantly suppresses the former. Yet only the change in strength of local subthalamic nucleus oscillations correlates with the degree of improvement during deep brain stimulation, compatible with the current view that a strengthened hyperdirect pathway is a prerequisite for locally generated beta activity but that it is the severity of the latter that may determine or index motor impairment.

Type: Article
Title: Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/brain/aww048
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aww048
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, deep brain stimulation, local field potential, magnetoencephalography, resting state networks
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1478196
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