UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Fatigue Management in Multiple Sclerosis approach

Tur, C; (2016) Fatigue Management in Multiple Sclerosis approach. Current Treatment Options in Neurology , 18 (6) , Article 26. 10.1007/s11940-016-0411-8. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Tur_art%3A10.1007%2Fs11940-016-0411-8.pdf

Download (344kB) | Preview

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that may entail severe levels of disability in the long term. However, independently of the level of disability, MS patients frequently experience severe fatigue that can be as disabling as objective neurological deficits. For that reason, it is mandatory to perform an early diagnosis of MS-related fatigue and start a suitable treatment as soon as possible. In clinical practice, MS-related fatigue should be assessed and managed by a multidisciplinary team involving Neurologists, MS Nurses, Occupational Therapists, and Physiotherapists. When assessing a person with MS-related fatigue, the first step is to rule out potential triggers or causes of fatigue, which may be related to MS, such as urinary dysfunction, pain, or muscular spasms leading to a sleep disorder, or unrelated to it. Once these causes have been ruled out and appropriately tackled, a careful therapeutic intervention needs to be decided. Therapeutic interventions for MS-related fatigue can be pharmacological or non-pharmacological. Regarding the pharmacological treatments, although many drugs have been tested in clinical trials, only amantadine is currently recommended for this indication. Regarding the non-pharmacological approaches, they can be broadly divided into physical, psychological, and mixed physical/psychological interventions. Several studies, many of them randomised clinical trials, support the use of all these types of non-pharmacological interventions to treat MS-related fatigue. Recent publications suggest that the implementation of mixed approaches, which have a naturally comprehensive nature, may have excellent results in clinical practice, in relation not only to fatigue levels, but also to more general aspects of MS.

Type: Article
Title: Fatigue Management in Multiple Sclerosis approach
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s11940-016-0411-8
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11940-016-0411-8
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Fatigue, Disability, FSS, MFIS, VAS, Multidisciplinary, Exercise, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Energy conservation education programmes, Mindfulness intervention, FACETS, EXIMS, NICE guidelines
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1478119
Downloads since deposit
155Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item