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Adverse effect of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on arterial stiffness in Europeans, South Asians, and African Caribbeans in the SABRE study

Park, CM; Tillin, T; March, K; Jones, S; Whincup, PH; Mayet, J; Chaturvedi, N; (2016) Adverse effect of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on arterial stiffness in Europeans, South Asians, and African Caribbeans in the SABRE study. Journal of Hypertension , 34 (2) pp. 282-289. 10.1097/HJH.0000000000000789. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Ethnic minority groups in the UK experience marked differences in cardiovascular disease risk. We investigated differences in arterial central haemodynamics, stiffness, and load in a tri-ethnic population-based cohort. METHODS: A total of 1312 participants (70 ± 6 years) underwent echocardiography and measurement of brachial and central blood pressure to assess central arterial haemodynamics including central pulse pressure (cPP), arterial stiffness [cPP/stroke volume (SV)], systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and load (Ea). RESULTS: Brachial and central SBPs were similar in all ethnic groups. Compared with Europeans, cPP, cPP/SV, and Ea were higher in South Asians. In contrast, cPP/SV was lower in African Caribbeans despite higher mean arterial pressure, higher SVR, and higher diabetes prevalence. cPP/SV and Ea remained significantly higher in South Asians and significantly lower in African Caribbeans after multivariate adjustment. Diabetes and higher HbA1c were more strongly associated with higher cPP/SV in South Asians than in Europeans (Pinteraction = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively); higher HbA1c was also more strongly associated with increased Ea in South Asians than Europeans (Pinteraction = 0.01). There was no evidence of an interaction between glycaemia and cPP/SV in African Caribbeans. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Europeans, South Asians have unfavorable arterial function. Diabetes and hyperglycaemia have a more deleterious effect on cPP/SV and Ea in South Asians. In contrast, African Caribbeans have more favourable arterial function than Europeans and South Asians. These differences may contribute to the differential ethnic rates of cardiovascular disease.

Type: Article
Title: Adverse effect of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on arterial stiffness in Europeans, South Asians, and African Caribbeans in the SABRE study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000000789
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000000789
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Arterial stiffness, blood pressure, diabetes, ethnicity, haemodynamics, hyperglycaemia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1477230
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