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Peer victimisation during adolescence and its impact on depression in early adulthood: prospective cohort study in the United Kingdom

Bowes, L; Joinson, C; Wolke, D; Lewis, G; (2016) Peer victimisation during adolescence and its impact on depression in early adulthood: prospective cohort study in the United Kingdom. British Journal of Sports Medicine , 50 (3) pp. 176-183. 10.1136/bjsports-2015-h2469rep. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the strength of the association between victimisation by peers at age 13 years and depression at 18 years. DESIGN: Longitudinal observational study. SETTING: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a UK community based birth cohort. PARTICIPANTS: 6719 participants who reported on peer victimisation at age 13 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Depression defined according to international classification of diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) criteria, assessed using the clinical interview schedule-revised during clinic assessments with participants when they were aged 18 years. 3898 participants had data on both victimisation by peers at age 13 years and depression at age 18 years. RESULTS: Of the 683 participants who reported frequent victimisation at age 13 years, 101 (14.8%) were depressed according to ICD-10 criteria at 18 years; of the 1446 participants reporting some victimisation at age 13 years, 103 (7.1%) were depressed at age 18 years; and of the 1769 participants reporting no victimisation at age 13 years, 98 (5.5%) were depressed at age 18 years. Compared with children who were not victimised those who were frequently victimised by peers had over a twofold increase in odds of depression (odds ratio 2.96, 95% confidence interval 2.21 to 3.97, P<0.001). This association was slightly reduced when adjusting for confounders (2.32, 1.49 to 3.63, P<0.001). The population attributable fraction suggested that 29.2% (95% confidence interval 10.9% to 43.7%) of depression at age 18 years could be explained by peer victimisation if this were a causal relation. CONCLUSION: When using observational data it is impossible to be certain that associations are causal. However, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that victimisation by peers in adolescence is associated with an increase in the risk of developing depression as an adult.

Type: Article
Title: Peer victimisation during adolescence and its impact on depression in early adulthood: prospective cohort study in the United Kingdom
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-h2469rep
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2015-h2469rep
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1476716
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