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Clinical outcome in patients with peripherally-sited atypical lipomatous tumours and dedifferentiated liposarcoma

Kalimuthu, SN; Tilley, C; Forbes, G; Ye, H; Lehovsky, K; Pillay, N; Seddon, BM; ... Flanagan, AM; + view all (2015) Clinical outcome in patients with peripherally-sited atypical lipomatous tumours and dedifferentiated liposarcoma. The Journal of Pathology: Clinical Research , 1 (2) pp. 106-112. 10.1002/cjp2.12. Green open access

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Abstract

The reported incidence of local recurrence of peripheral atypical lipomatous tumours is highly variable and is likely to reflect the different inclusion criteria of cases, and the design of previous studies. We aimed to study the incidence of local recurrence of 90 cases of atypical lipomatous tumours and an additional 18 cases of de novo dedifferentiated liposarcoma. All tumours were diagnosed on the basis of MDM2 amplification: all patients had their first treatment in the same specialist sarcoma unit and were followed for a minimum of 60 months. The tumours were diagnosed between 1997 and 2009 and followed until the end of 2014. Seventy cases (78%) of atypical lipomatous tumours were located in the thigh (mean size 195mm on presentation). Eight atypical lipomatous tumours (8.9%) recurred locally, of which 50% recurred after 60 months. The only two tumours with intralesional excisions recurred. Seven of the eight recurrent tumours were detected by the patient by self-examination. One case recurred a second time as a dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Seventeen per cent of the de novo dedifferentiated liposarcomas recurred within 60 months of presentation. Extending the study period revealed that atypical lipomatous tumour could recur up to 40 years after the first surgery. Furthermore, of 26 tumours that recurred in the extended study, 27% recurred more than once, and three of the seven that recurred more than once transformed into a dedifferentiated liposarcoma. We recommend that, following post-operative wound care, patients with atypical lipomatous tumour are referred back to their general practitioner for follow up, but that in the event of a suspected recurrence they have rapid access back to the specialist unit using a ‘supported discharge’ scheme. In the event of an intralesional excision and if a lesion recurs, patients are followed in a specialist unit at regular intervals: whether MRI scanning is a valuable means of monitoring such patients is unclear and requires an evidence base.

Type: Article
Title: Clinical outcome in patients with peripherally-sited atypical lipomatous tumours and dedifferentiated liposarcoma
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/cjp2.12
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cjp2.12
Additional information: © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Pathology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1476368
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