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The development of Attitudes of People from Ethnic Minorities to Help-Seeking for Dementia (APEND): a questionnaire to measure attitudes to help-seeking for dementia in people from South Asian backgrounds in the UK

Hailstone, J; Mukadam, N; Owen, T; Cooper, C; Livingston, G; (2017) The development of Attitudes of People from Ethnic Minorities to Help-Seeking for Dementia (APEND): a questionnaire to measure attitudes to help-seeking for dementia in people from South Asian backgrounds in the UK. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry , 32 (3) pp. 288-296. 10.1002/gps.4462. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: People from South Asian backgrounds present to dementia services relatively late, often responding to crises. We aimed to devise and validate a theory of planned behaviour questionnaire to measure attitudes that predict medical help-seeking for UK-based South Asian people, to assess the effectiveness of future interventions promoting earlier help-seeking. METHODS: We used focus groups to establish the content validity of culturally relevant questionnaire items, then asked participants to complete the questionnaire. We analysed reliability and validity and established the concurrent validity of questionnaire attitudes through correlation with willingness to seek help from a doctor for memory problems. We also correlated the scale with knowledge of dementia. RESULTS: The strongest predictor of willingness to seek help was perceived social pressure from significant others around help-seeking; these attitudes were associated with beliefs about the views of family members and embarrassment around help-seeking. Willingness to seek help was also strongly associated with attitudes about the benefits of seeing a doctor for memory problems, attitudes that were related to specific beliefs about what doctors can do to help. Attitudes in the questionnaire predicted 77% of variance in willingness to seek help, but no relationship was found with dementia knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: We present the Attitudes of People from Ethnic Minorities to Help-Seeking for Dementia (APEND) questionnaire, a valid and reliable measure of attitudes that influence help-seeking for dementia in people from South Asian backgrounds, which could assess the impact of intervention studies. We suggest that interventions target attitudes specified here, rather than dementia knowledge. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Type: Article
Title: The development of Attitudes of People from Ethnic Minorities to Help-Seeking for Dementia (APEND): a questionnaire to measure attitudes to help-seeking for dementia in people from South Asian backgrounds in the UK
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/gps.4462
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.4462
Language: English
Additional information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hailstone, J; Mukadam, N; Owen, T; Cooper, C; Livingston, G; (2016) The development of Attitudes of People from Ethnic Minorities to Help-Seeking for Dementia (APEND): a questionnaire to measure attitudes to help-seeking for dementia in people from South Asian backgrounds in the UK. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.4462. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. Access may be initially restricted by the publisher.
Keywords: South Asian, attitudes, dementia, help-seeking, minority ethnic (ME), questionnaire
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1474990
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