UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Socioeconomic inequality in access to high-status colleges: A cross-country comparison

Jerrim, J; Chmielewski, AK; Parker, P; (2015) Socioeconomic inequality in access to high-status colleges: A cross-country comparison. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility , 42 (C) pp. 20-32. 10.1016/j.rssm.2015.06.003. Green open access

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S027656241500044X-main.pdf]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S027656241500044X-main.pdf

Download (766kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper considers the relationship between family background, academic achievement in high school and access to high-status postsecondary institutions in three developed countries (Australia, England and the United States). We begin by estimating the unconditional association between family background and access to a high status university, before examining how this relationship changes once academic achievement in high school is controlled. Our results suggest that high achieving disadvantaged children are much less likely to enter a high-status college than their more advantaged peers, and that the magnitude of this socio-economic gradient is broadly similar across these three countries. However, we also find that socio-economic inequality in access to high-status private US colleges is much more pronounced than access to their public sector counterparts (both within the US and when compared overseas).

Type: Article
Title: Socioeconomic inequality in access to high-status colleges: A cross-country comparison
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2015.06.003
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2015.06.003
Language: English
Additional information: © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1472509
Downloads since deposit
154Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item