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Putting the spooks back in? The UK secret state and the history of computing

Agar, JE; (2016) Putting the spooks back in? The UK secret state and the history of computing. Information & Culture: a Journal of History , 51 (1) pp. 102-124. 10.1353/lac.2016.0005. Green open access

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Abstract

The post–World War II secret state (governmental bodies that handle national security, including signals intelligence, spying, counterintelligence, and some aspects of policing, as well as the central bureaucratic mechanisms of their control) is a lacuna in the history of UK computing. This article assesses the extent to which the UK secret state was a major user of computing technologies and examines the character of its computing tasks, as well as its relationships with industry and government, more broadly.

Type: Article
Title: Putting the spooks back in? The UK secret state and the history of computing
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1353/lac.2016.0005
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lac.2016.0005
Language: English
Additional information: This is a pre-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in Information & Culture: A Journal of History following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available through the University of Texas Press.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Science and Technology Studies
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1469610
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