UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Laser refractive surgery in the UK Biobank study: Frequency, distribution by sociodemographic factors, and general health, happiness, and social participation outcomes

Cumberland, PM; Chianca, A; Rahi, JS; (2015) Laser refractive surgery in the UK Biobank study: Frequency, distribution by sociodemographic factors, and general health, happiness, and social participation outcomes. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , 41 (11) pp. 2466-2475. 10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.05.040. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
JCRS-15-270_Cumberland.pdf

Download (836kB) | Preview

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the frequency and distribution of laser refractive surgery in the United Kingdom by sociodemographic factors and outcomes of social participation and well-being. SETTING: Six regional recruitment centers in England and Wales. DESIGN: Cross-sectional epidemiological study. METHODS: Data were collected on sociodemographic factors and medical history; self-report on eyes/vision included reason for wearing optical correction, eye diseases, and treatment received (including refractive laser surgery). Mean spherical equivalent was used to categorize individuals as myopic (<-1.0 diopter) or hypertrophic (>+1.0 diopter). RESULTS: Between 2009 and 2010, 117 281 subjects recruited by UK Biobank undertook an ophthalmic assessment, including autorefraction. Of those with refractive error within a range eligible for laser refractive surgery (n = 60 352), 1892 (3.1%) reported having bilateral refractive surgery and 549 (0.9%) unilateral surgery. Frequency of bilateral surgery decreased with increasing age and was higher in women. Frequency did not vary with educational attainment or accommodation status but increased with income among working age adults. Social participation, for example, regular visits to a pub or social club, was more common among those who underwent surgery. Other eye conditions were reported by 28% of those reporting refractive surgery compared with 11% of those eligible for treatment but not reporting surgery. CONCLUSION: This study provides information not available routinely on the frequency and distribution of laser refractive surgery in an adult UK population. A high frequency of ocular conditions conventionally considered contraindications to laser refractive surgery raises the possibility that extant guidance on patient selection may not be followed.

Type: Article
Title: Laser refractive surgery in the UK Biobank study: Frequency, distribution by sociodemographic factors, and general health, happiness, and social participation outcomes
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.05.040
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.05.040
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. This manuscript version is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This license allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licenses are available at http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0. Access may be initially restricted by the publisher.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1469153
Downloads since deposit
69Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item