UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Neural responses to others' pain vary with psychopathic traits in healthy adult males.

Seara-Cardoso, A; Viding, E; Lickley, RA; Sebastian, CL; (2015) Neural responses to others' pain vary with psychopathic traits in healthy adult males. Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 10.3758/s13415-015-0346-7. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
Seara-Cardoso.art_10.3758_s13415-015-0346-7.pdf

Download (558kB)

Abstract

Disrupted empathic processing is a core feature of psychopathy. Neuroimaging data have suggested that individuals with high levels of psychopathic traits show atypical responses to others' pain in a network of brain regions typically recruited during empathic processing (anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and mid- and anterior cingulate cortex). Here, we investigated whether neural responses to others' pain vary with psychopathic traits within the general population in a similar manner to that found in individuals at the extreme end of the continuum. As predicted, variation in psychopathic traits was associated with variation in neural responses to others' pain in the network of brain regions typically engaged during empathic processing. Consistent with previous research, our findings indicated the presence of suppressor effects in the association of levels of the affective-interpersonal and lifestyle-antisocial dimensions of psychopathy with neural responses to others' pain. That is, after controlling for the influence of the other dimension, higher affective-interpersonal psychopathic traits were associated with reduced neural responses to others' pain, whilst higher lifestyle-antisocial psychopathic traits were associated with increased neural responses to others' pain. Our findings provide further evidence that atypical function in this network might represent neural markers of disrupted emotional and empathic processing; that the two dimensions of psychopathy might tap into distinct underlying vulnerabilities; and, most importantly, that the relationships observed at the extreme end of the psychopathy spectrum apply to the nonclinical distribution of these traits, providing further evidence for continuities in the mechanisms underlying psychopathic traits across the general population.

Type: Article
Title: Neural responses to others' pain vary with psychopathic traits in healthy adult males.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3758/s13415-015-0346-7
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-015-0346-7
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2015. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
Keywords: Empathy, Psychopathic personality, fMRI, Anterior insula, Midcingulate gyrus, Inferior frontal gyrus.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1466645
Downloads since deposit
88Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item