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High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice.

Christensen, KE; Mikael, LG; Leung, KY; Lévesque, N; Deng, L; Wu, Q; Malysheva, OV; ... Rozen, R; + view all (2015) High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 101 (3) 646 - 658. 10.3945/ajcn.114.086603. Green open access

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Abstract

Increased consumption of folic acid is prevalent, leading to concerns about negative consequences. The effects of folic acid on the liver, the primary organ for folate metabolism, are largely unknown. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) provides methyl donors for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis and methylation reactions.

Type: Article
Title: High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086603
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.086603
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed under the CC-BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Keywords: Choline metabolism, Folic acid, Lipid metabolism, Liver, Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1466053
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