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High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer prevention in Britain: Evidence of differential uptake of interventions from a probability survey

Tanton, C; Soldan, K; Beddows, S; Mercer, CH; Waller, J; Field, N; Clifton, S; ... Sonnenberg, P; + view all (2015) High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer prevention in Britain: Evidence of differential uptake of interventions from a probability survey. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev , 24 pp. 842-853. 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1333. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) provides an opportunity to explore high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), and uptake of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in the general population. Methods: Natsal-3, a probability sample survey of men and women aged 16-74, resident in Britain, interviewed 8869 women in 2010-12. We explored risk factors for HR-HPV (in urine from 2569 sexually-experienced women aged 16-44), non-attendance for cervical screening in the past 5 years and non-completion of HPV catch-up vaccination. Results: HR-HPV was associated with increasing numbers of lifetime partners, younger age, increasing area-level deprivation and smoking. Screening non-attendance was associated with younger and older age, increasing area-level deprivation (age-adjusted odds ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval, 1.48 to 2.47 for living in most vs. least deprived two quintiles), Asian/Asian British ethnicity (1.96, 1.32 to 2.90), smoking (1.97, 1.57 to 2.47) and reporting no partner in the past 5 years (2.45, 1.67 to 3.61 vs. 1 partner) but not with HR-HPV (1.35, 0.79 to 2.31). Lower uptake of HPV catch-up vaccination was associated with increasing area-level deprivation, non-white ethnicity, smoking and increasing lifetime partners. Conclusions: Socio-economic markers and smoking were associated with HR-HPV positivity, non-attendance for cervical screening and non-completion of catch-up HPV vaccination. Impact: The cervical screening programme needs to engage those missing HPV catch-up vaccination to avoid a potential widening of cervical cancer disparities in these cohorts. As some screening non-attenders are at low-risk for HR-HPV, tailored approaches may be appropriate to increase screening among higher-risk women.

Type: Article
Title: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer prevention in Britain: Evidence of differential uptake of interventions from a probability survey
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1333
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1333
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1463402
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