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Evidence for increasing severity of community-onset boils and abscesses in UK General Practice

Shallcross, LJ; Hayward, AC; Johnson, AM; Petersen, I; (2015) Evidence for increasing severity of community-onset boils and abscesses in UK General Practice. Epidemiology and Infection , 143 (11) pp. 2426-2429. 10.1017/S0950268814003458. Green open access

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Abstract

SUMMARY In England, hospital admissions for severe staphylococcal boils and abscesses trebled between 1989 and 2004. We investigated this trend using routine data from primary and secondary care. We used The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large primary-care database and national data on hospital admissions from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Time trends in the incidence of primary-care consultations for boils and abscesses were estimated for 1995-2010. HES data were used to calculate age-standardized hospital admission rates for boils, abscesses and cellulitis. The incidence of boil or abscess was 450 [95% confidence interval (CI) 447-452] per 100 000 person-years and increased slightly over the study period (incidence rate ratio 1·005, 95% CI 1·004-1·007). The rate of repeat consultation for a boil or abscess increased from 66 (95% CI 59-73) per 100 000 person-years in 1995 to peak at 97 (95% CI 94-101) per 100 000 person-years in 2006, remaining stable thereafter. Hospital admissions for abscesses, carbuncles, furuncles and cellulitis almost doubled, from 123 admissions per 100 000 in 1998/1999 to 236 admissions per 100 000 in 2010/2011. Rising hospitalization and recurrence rates set against a background of stable community incidence suggests increased disease severity. Patients may be experiencing more severe and recurrent staphylococcal skin disease with limited treatment options.

Type: Article
Title: Evidence for increasing severity of community-onset boils and abscesses in UK General Practice
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0950268814003458
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814003458
Language: English
Additional information: This article has been published in a revised form in Epidemiology and Infection: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814003458. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014.
Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, Community epidemics, epidemiology, incidence, public health
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1460261
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