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Empirical variation in 24-h profiles of delivered power for a sample of UK dwellings: Implications for evaluating energy savings

Summerfield, AJ; Oreszczyn, T; Hamilton, IG; Shipworth, D; Huebner, GM; Lowe, RJ; Ruyssevelt, P; (2015) Empirical variation in 24-h profiles of delivered power for a sample of UK dwellings: Implications for evaluating energy savings. ENERGY AND BUILDINGS , 88 193 - 202. 10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.11.075. Green open access

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Abstract

Improved methods for quantifying energy savings in buildings need to be supported by empirical measures rather than modeled estimates of future annual energy demand. This paper uses power temperature gradient (PTG, W/K), or the slope of power demand in response to changes in external air temperature; first, to categorise dwelling energy performance from daily energy data (when 0–15 °C outside); second, to investigate variations in 24-h profiles of delivered power. Estimates of PTG were obtained from 567 UK dwellings with 118,000 days of gas and electricity data. From a multivariable regression model, PTG was predicted by dwelling characteristics (number of bedrooms, number of floors, dwelling type, and dwelling age category (all p < 0.001)) but not by number of occupants. When dwellings were grouped into quintiles of PTG, mean PTG had threefold increase from the first to fifth quintile (188 to 563 W/K, respectively). This was reflected in 24-h profiles of delivered power (30 min intervals): at 0 °C, each 100 W/K decline in PTG corresponded to ∼2.5 kW decline in mean morning and evening peak power. Using PTG to estimate reductions in peak power as equivalent ‘negawatts’ reframes potential benefits of energy efficiency retrofits and for grid resilience.

Type: Article
Title: Empirical variation in 24-h profiles of delivered power for a sample of UK dwellings: Implications for evaluating energy savings
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.11.075
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.11.075
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Keywords: Energy demand, Residential sector, Energy efficiency, Peak power demand
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1459784
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