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Myoelectric Signal Transmission from Implanted Epimysial Electrodes Using a Bone-Anchor as a Conduit

Al Ajam, Y; Lancashire, H; Pendegrass, C; Kang, N; Dowling, R; Taylor, S; Blunn, G; (2014) Myoelectric Signal Transmission from Implanted Epimysial Electrodes Using a Bone-Anchor as a Conduit. Presented at: Americal Hand Surgery Annual Meeting, Hawaii, USA. Green open access

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Abstract

Introduction Current Upper-limb myoelectric prostheses rely on only 2 control signals from surface electrodes, placed over antagonistic muscles in the amputation stump, for limb control. While this has benefits over the traditional body-powered control, there are disadvantages; electrode lift-off, impedance variation, cross-talk, reliability, and limitations in intuitive control. To address these problems, electrodes can be implanted directly on individual muscles responsible for specific actions. Not only does this address skin-related issues, it reduces cross-talk and greatly increases the number of control channels for multi degrees of freedom intuitive control. Bone-anchored devices can be used to overcome problems with prosthetic attachment and additionally used to transfer control signals from these implantable electrodes to the prosthesis. [1] In above-elbow amputees, targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) enables more signal generation by redirecting nerves previously controlling the amputated muscles in the forearm, to surrogate muscles in the torso (e.g. pectoralis major). [2] We describe in vivo model using implantable electrodes to record myoelectric signals (MES) in normal muscles and following TMR, utilizing a bone-anchor as a conduit to carry signals across the skin barrier. Materials and Methods An in vivo n=6 ovine model was used. A bone-anchor was placed trans-tibially and bipolar electrodes sutured to M. Peroneus Tertius (PT). In a further n=1, motor nerve to PT was divided and coapted with a motor branch from peroneal nerve. MES were recorded over a 12-week period. Functional recovery in the TMR model was assessed by MES and force-plate analysis (FPA). Results In the n=6 group, there was a positive correlation between signal to noise ratio (SNR) and time since implantation (p < 0.005), with a mean SNR of 7 by week 12. In the TMR model, functional recovery was observed after 6 weeks. Difference between legs returned to normal (pre-op: left 4.7 N/kg, right 4.8 N/kg; 80 days post-op: left 4.1 N/kg, right 4.3 N/kg). Recorded MES from TMR muscle compared favourably with healthy muscle. Conclusions We have demonstrated that a bone-anchor is a reliable and robust conduit for transmitting MES over a period of 12 weeks. The combination of implanted electrodes & direct skeletal fixation offers clear advantages over current systems for prosthetic attachment & control. This system forms the basis of a complete solution for prosthetic rehabilitation, which can also be used in the context of TMR. References 1. Al Ajam et. al., 2013. PMID: 23358938 2. Kuiken et. al., 2004. PMID: 15658637

Type: Poster
Title: Myoelectric Signal Transmission from Implanted Epimysial Electrodes Using a Bone-Anchor as a Conduit
Event: Americal Hand Surgery Annual Meeting
Location: Hawaii, USA
Dates: 08 - 11 January 2014
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://meeting.handsurgery.org/abstracts/2014-prog...
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1457068
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