UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Is children's reading "good enough"? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences

Wonnacott, E; Joseph, HS; Adelman, JS; Nation, K; (2016) Is children's reading "good enough"? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , 69 (5) pp. 855-879. 10.1080/17470218.2015.1011176. Green open access

[thumbnail of Wonnacott_Is childrens reading_good enough_Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences.pdf]
Preview
Text
Wonnacott_Is childrens reading_good enough_Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences.pdf

Download (509kB) | Preview

Abstract

We monitored 8- and 10-year-old children's eye movements as they read sentences containing a temporary syntactic ambiguity to obtain a detailed record of their online processing. Children showed the classic garden-path effect in online processing. Their reading was disrupted following disambiguation, relative to control sentences containing a comma to block the ambiguity, although the disruption occurred somewhat later than would be expected for mature readers. We also asked children questions to probe their comprehension of the syntactic ambiguity offline. They made more errors following ambiguous sentences than following control sentences, demonstrating that the initial incorrect parse of the garden-path sentence influenced offline comprehension. These findings are consistent with "good enough" processing effects seen in adults. While faster reading times and more regressions were generally associated with better comprehension, spending longer reading the question predicted comprehension success specifically in the ambiguous condition. This suggests that reading the question prompted children to reconstruct the sentence and engage in some form of processing, which in turn increased the likelihood of comprehension success. Older children were more sensitive to the syntactic function of commas, and, overall, they were faster and more accurate than younger children.

Type: Article
Title: Is children's reading "good enough"? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2015.1011176
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2015.1011176
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 The Experimental Psychology Society. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, May 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/ 10.1080/17470218.2015.1011176
Keywords: Children's sentence processing, Eye movements, Good enough sentence processing, Reading development, Reanalysis, Syntactic ambiguity, Garden-path Sentences, Lingering Misinterpretations, Lexical-biases, Wrap-up, Recovery, Representations, Plausibility, Constraints
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1454893
Downloads since deposit
110Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item