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Evaluation of decellularization protocols for production of tubular small intestine submucosa scaffolds for use in oesophageal tissue engineering.

Syed, O; Walters, NJ; Day, RM; Kim, HW; Knowles, JC; (2014) Evaluation of decellularization protocols for production of tubular small intestine submucosa scaffolds for use in oesophageal tissue engineering. Acta Biomaterialia , 10 (12) 5043 - 5054. 10.1016/j.actbio.2014.08.024. Green open access

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Abstract

Small intestine submucosa (SIS) has emerged as one of a number of naturally derived extracellular matrix (ECM) biomaterials currently in clinical use. In addition to clinical applications, ECM materials form the basis for a variety of approaches within tissue engineering research. In our preliminary work it was found that SIS can be consistently and reliably made into tubular scaffolds which confer certain potential advantages. Given that decellularization protocols for SIS are applied to sheet-form SIS, it was hypothesized that a tubular-form SIS would behave differently to pre-existing protocols. In this work, tubular SIS was produced and decellularized by the conventional peracetic acid-agitation method, peracetic acid under perfusion along with two commonly used detergent-perfusion protocols. The aim of this was to produce a tubular SIS that was both adequately decellularized and possessing the mechanical properties which would make it a suitable scaffold for oesophageal tissue engineering, which was one of the goals of this work. Analysis was carried out via mechanical tensile testing, DNA quantification, scanning electron and light microscopy, and a metabolic assay, which was used to give an indication of the biocompatibility of each decellularization method. Both peracetic acid protocols were shown to be unsuitable methods with the agitation-protocol-produced SIS, which was poorly decellularized, and the perfusion protocol resulted in poor mechanical properties. Both detergent-based protocols produced well-decellularized SIS, with no adverse mechanical effects; however, one protocol emerged, SDS/Triton X-100, which proved superior in both respects. However, this SIS showed reduced metabolic activity, and this cytotoxic effect was attributed to residual reagents. Consequently, the use of SIS produced using the detergent SD as the decellularization agent was deemed to be the most suitable, although the elimination of the DNase enzyme would give further improvement.

Type: Article
Title: Evaluation of decellularization protocols for production of tubular small intestine submucosa scaffolds for use in oesophageal tissue engineering.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2014.08.024
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2014.08.024
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Keywords: SDS, SIS, Small intestine submucosa, Triton X-100, Tubular
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Biomaterials and Tissue Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1447328
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