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Urinary concentration: different ways to open and close the tap.

Bockenhauer, D; Bichet, DG; (2014) Urinary concentration: different ways to open and close the tap. Pediatric Nephrology , 29 (8) 1297 - 1303. 10.1007/s00467-013-2526-4. Green open access

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Abstract

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) provides an excellent model for the benefits and insights that can be gained from studying rare diseases. The discovery of underlying genes identified key molecules involved in urinary concentration, including the type 2 vasopressin receptor AVPR2 and the water channel AQP2, which constitute obvious pharmacologic targets. Subsequently developed drugs targeting AVPR2 not only provide potential benefit to some patients with NDI, but are now used for much more common clinical applications as diverse as nocturnal enuresis and heart failure. Yet, the story is still evolving: clinical observations and animal experiments continue to discover new ways to affect urinary concentration. These novel pathways can potentially be exploited for therapeutic gain. Here we review the (patho)physiology of water homoeostasis, the current status of clinical management, and potential new treatments.

Type: Article
Title: Urinary concentration: different ways to open and close the tap.
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00467-013-2526-4
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-013-2526-4
Language: English
Additional information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-013-2526-4.
Keywords: Body Water, Child, Diabetes Insipidus, Nephrogenic, Humans, Kidney Concentrating Ability
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1447307
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