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The influence of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms in children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery

Igreja, S; (2006) The influence of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms in children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Genetic factors may influence the outcome from surgery. Mannose-Binding lectin (MBL) is an important factor in innate immune defense. MBL gene polymorphisms result in deficiency of the encoded protein and increase susceptibility to infection. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between MBL-2 exon 1 polymorphisms and outcome of children after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. Two hundred and forty four patients were recruited to this study. Patient's MBL-2 genotype was determined and compared with respect to sepsis development, length of stay in intensive care and duration of mechanical ventilation. The exon 1 polymorphisms were more common in the patients with sepsis compared to the non-sepsis group (36% vs. 47%). It was observed a higher proportion of MBL-2 variant alleles in the patients who required prolonged stay compared to the short stay group (38% vs. 51%). Similarly, MBL-2 variant alleles were more common in those who required prolonged ventilation compared to those who required less ventilation (33% vs. 50%). Three was a significant association between MBL-2 genotype and the duration of ventilation (p = 0.033). The data from this study showed that MBL-2 exon 1 polymorphisms may play an important role in the outcome of children undergoing surgery.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: The influence of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms in children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery
Identifier: PQ ETD:593262
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1445938
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