UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Endovascular photodynamic therapy for preventing post-angioplasty and in-stent restenosis.

Pai, M.L.; (2005) Endovascular photodynamic therapy for preventing post-angioplasty and in-stent restenosis. Doctoral thesis , University of London. Green open access

[img] Text
U593184 Redacted.PDF

Download (10MB)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is the commonest cause of death in the western world and atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of cardiovascular disease. It is characterised by the deposition of intra-luminal plaque leading to arterial stenosis. Balloon angioplasty offers a minimally invasive method of dilating peripheral and coronary arterial stenosis. The results of angioplasty are improved by stenting. However, a significant percentage of these patients have restenosis of their arteries with clinical and resource implications. Restenosis is caused by neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) and negative remodelling the combined effects of which result in vessel re-narrowing. It has previously been shown in animal models that photodynamic therapy (PDT) reduces the restenosis when used as an adjuvant to angioplasty. PDT involves the interaction of light at a particular wavelength with a pre-administered photosensitive agent to produce cell death by apoptosis in the presence of oxygen. The aims of this thesis are two fold. 1. to optimise the effects of PDT in preventing in-stent restenosis 2. to conduct a randomised controlled trial to show the clinical benefits of PDT in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Endovascular photodynamic therapy for preventing post-angioplasty and in-stent restenosis.
Identifier: PQ ETD:593184
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by Proquest
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1445860
Downloads since deposit
119Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item