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Attachment and conduct problems: Using the child attachment interview to examine the relationship in middle childhood and early adolescence.

Lapsley, A-M.; (2006) Attachment and conduct problems: Using the child attachment interview to examine the relationship in middle childhood and early adolescence. Doctoral thesis , University of London. Green open access

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Abstract

This review investigates the role of attachment security in the development of later externalizing behaviour problems. 33 studies were identified which have examined this relationship and these are discussed in terms of their key findings. The majority of these studies broadly support the idea that attachment insecurity and behaviour problems are linked. Differences in the findings across studies are discussed with consideration of the level of risk of the sample, gender of the children within the sample, type of measurement of behaviour problems, specific attachment classifications and the interaction of attachment with other variables. Future research investigating the nature of the interaction of attachment with other variables, particularly environmental risk, is suggested, as is further research into the mechanisms by which attachment influences future behaviour and the role of internal working models.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Attachment and conduct problems: Using the child attachment interview to examine the relationship in middle childhood and early adolescence.
Identifier: PQ ETD:592973
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by Proquest
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1445649
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