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Multi-impulsive eating disorders: the role of distress tolerance and invalidating environments.

Evans, J.; (2006) Multi-impulsive eating disorders: the role of distress tolerance and invalidating environments. Doctoral thesis , University of London. Green open access

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Abstract

Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) was developed by Linehan (1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The model proposes that BPD is primarily a dysfunction of the emotion regulation system, and that impulsive behaviours (e.g., self-harm, compulsive spending, risky sexual behaviour, alcohol abuse) serve the function of regulating emotion regulation. It has been proposed that binge eating may also serve a similar function (e.g., Root & Fallon, 1989). For this reason the DBT model has been adapted for eating disorders (e.g., Telch, Agras & Linehan, 2001 Safer, Telch & Agras, 2001). This review will consider whether the DBT model can further our understanding of the eating disorders, and whether it can suggest future directions for clinical interventions with this client group. The paper will begin with a discussion of why the DBT model should be considered for application to the eating disorders. It will then provide an overview of the biosocial model (Linehan, 1993) that forms the basis for DBT. The DBT treatment will be outlined, and a review of the empirical evidence for DBT and its application to the eating disorders will follow.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Multi-impulsive eating disorders: the role of distress tolerance and invalidating environments.
Identifier: PQ ETD:592796
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by Proquest
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1445474
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