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The Milton Keynes tariff approach to seeking development contributions - a credible alternative to existing mechanisms?

Morris, David; (2006) The Milton Keynes tariff approach to seeking development contributions - a credible alternative to existing mechanisms? Masters thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Given the planning gain supplement (PGS) consultation undertaken by the former ODPM, this dissertation aims to understand the multiple approaches available to planners in seeking development contributions to fund infrastructure, particularly affordable housing. The current negotiated section 106 arrangements and proposed PGS approach form the context for considering the viability of a tariff based system as a credible alternative. The example of the Milton Keynes tariff, administered through a partnership of public and private bodies, forms the case study for the report. Given strong policy guidance and a firm consensus amongst actors upon the vision for an area, the qualitative analysis of stakeholder's perceptions within the case study demonstrates the real potential that the tariff possesses in seeking contributions from development. In suggesting that a tariff approach presents a viable alternative to current arrangements in capturing value uplift from development, the report concludes that a successful and effective tariff must be rooted in a strong LDF, benefit from collaboration between actors, be levied at an appropriate spatial scale and retain as much of the rational nexus as feasibly possible. In conducting this research, a clear argument is made for the use of tariff based approaches elsewhere and encourages further research on the debate.

Type: Thesis (Masters)
Title: The Milton Keynes tariff approach to seeking development contributions - a credible alternative to existing mechanisms?
Identifier: PQ ETD:592194
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Third party copyright material has been removed from the ethesis. Images identifying individuals have been redacted or partially redacted to protect their identity.
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1444884
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