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Adolescent self-organization predicts midlife memory in a prospective birth cohort study

Xu, MK; Jones, PB; Barnett, JH; Gaysina, D; Kuh, D; Croudace, TJ; Richards, M; (2013) Adolescent self-organization predicts midlife memory in a prospective birth cohort study. Psychology and Aging , 28 (4) 958 - 968. 10.1037/a0033787. Green open access

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Abstract

Childhood and adolescent mental health have a lasting impact on adult life chances, with strong implications for subsequent health, including cognitive aging. Using the British 1946 birth cohort, the authors tested associations between adolescent conduct problems, emotional problems and aspects of self-organization, and verbal memory at 43 years and rate of decline in verbal memory from 43 to 60-64 years. After controlling for childhood intelligence, adolescent self-organization was positively associated with verbal memory at 43 years, mainly through educational attainment, although not with rate of memory decline. Associations between adolescent conduct and emotional problems and future memory were of negligible magnitude. It has been suggested that interventions to improve self-organization may save a wide range of societal costs; this study also suggests that this might also benefit cognitive function in later life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Type: Article
Title: Adolescent self-organization predicts midlife memory in a prospective birth cohort study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1037/a0033787
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033787
Language: English
Additional information: This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Copyright for this article is retained by the author(s). Author(s) grant(s) the American Psychological Association the exclusive right to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1443488
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