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Stress relief as the driving force for self-assembled Bi nanolines

Owen, JHG; Miki, K; Koh, H; Yeom, HW; Bowler, DR; (2002) Stress relief as the driving force for self-assembled Bi nanolines. PHYS REV LETT , 88 (22) , Article 226104. 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.226104. Green open access

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Abstract

Bi nanolines self-assemble on Si(001) and are remarkable for their straightness and length-they are often more than 400 nm long, and a kink in a nanoline has never been observed. Through electronic structure calculations, we have found an energetically favorable structure for these nanolines that agrees with our scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission experiments; the structure has an extremely unusual subsurface structure, comprising a double core of seven-membered rings of silicon. Our proposed structure explains all the observed features of the nanolines, and shows that surface stress resulting from the mismatch between the Bi and the Si substrates is responsible for their self-assembly. This has wider implications for the controlled growth of nanostructures on semiconductor surfaces.

Type: Article
Title: Stress relief as the driving force for self-assembled Bi nanolines
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.226104
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.226104
Language: English
Keywords: SURFACE, BISMUTH, SI(001), GROWTH, NANOWIRE, SI(100), LINES
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Physics and Astronomy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/144204
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