UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Investigating Causal Brain-behavioral Relationships and their Time Course.

Sliwinska, MW; Vitello, S; Devlin, JT; (2014) Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Investigating Causal Brain-behavioral Relationships and their Time Course. J Vis Exp (89) , Article e51735. 10.3791/51735. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
jove-materials-51735-transcranial-magnetic-stimulation-for-investigating-causal-brain.pdf

Download (52kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF
jove-protocol-51735-transcranial-magnetic-stimulation-for-investigating-causal-brain.pdf

Download (247kB)

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a safe, non-invasive brain stimulation technique that uses a strong electromagnet in order to temporarily disrupt information processing in a brain region, generating a short-lived "virtual lesion." Stimulation that interferes with task performance indicates that the affected brain region is necessary to perform the task normally. In other words, unlike neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that indicate correlations between brain and behavior, TMS can be used to demonstrate causal brain-behavior relations. Furthermore, by varying the duration and onset of the virtual lesion, TMS can also reveal the time course of normal processing. As a result, TMS has become an important tool in cognitive neuroscience. Advantages of the technique over lesion-deficit studies include better spatial-temporal precision of the disruption effect, the ability to use participants as their own control subjects, and the accessibility of participants. Limitations include concurrent auditory and somatosensory stimulation that may influence task performance, limited access to structures more than a few centimeters from the surface of the scalp, and the relatively large space of free parameters that need to be optimized in order for the experiment to work. Experimental designs that give careful consideration to appropriate control conditions help to address these concerns. This article illustrates these issues with TMS results that investigate the spatial and temporal contributions of the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) to reading.

Type: Article
Title: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Investigating Causal Brain-behavioral Relationships and their Time Course.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3791/51735
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sft138
Language: English
Additional information: © 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License. The video component of this article can be found at http://www.jove.com/video/51735/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1437205
Downloads since deposit
238Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item