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Testing Ecological Theories of Offender Spatial Decision Making Using a Discrete Choice Model

Johnson, SD; Summers, L; (2015) Testing Ecological Theories of Offender Spatial Decision Making Using a Discrete Choice Model. Crime and Delinquency , 61 (3) 454 - 480. 10.1177/0011128714540276. Green open access

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Abstract

Research demonstrates that crime is spatially concentrated. However, most research relies on information about where crimes occur, without reference to where offenders reside. This study examines how the characteristics of neighborhoods and their proximity to offender home locations affect offender spatial decision making. Using a discrete choice model and data for detected incidents of theft from vehicles (TFV), we test predictions from two theoretical perspectives—crime pattern and social disorganization theories. We demonstrate that offenders favor areas that are low in social cohesion and closer to their home, or other age-related activity nodes. For adult offenders, choices also appear to be influenced by how accessible a neighborhood is via the street network. The implications for criminological theory and crime prevention are discussed.

Type: Article
Title: Testing Ecological Theories of Offender Spatial Decision Making Using a Discrete Choice Model
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/0011128714540276
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011128714540276
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (http://www.uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1434341
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