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Multi-analyte profiling and pathway analysis of plasma for proteins associated with cancer-related fatigue syndrome in disease-free breast cancer patients after primary treatment.

Minton, O; Coulton, GR; Stone, P; (2014) Multi-analyte profiling and pathway analysis of plasma for proteins associated with cancer-related fatigue syndrome in disease-free breast cancer patients after primary treatment. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , 4 (4) pp. 349-356. 10.1136/bmjspcare-2013-000452. Green open access

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Abstract

CONTEXT: A significant number of women treated for breast cancer develop long-term fatigue afterwards. Previous research has suggested that fatigue may be due to a prolonged inflammatory response. However, there are conflicting results and the exact nature of the disturbance remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To identify inflammatory markers associated with fatigue. METHODS: We recruited women from a breast cancer follow-up clinic and categorised them on the basis of a diagnostic interview as to whether they met the criteria for cancer-related fatigue syndrome (cases) or not (controls). We took plasma samples from each participant to analyse subsequently using a panel of 88 biological markers. RESULTS: 90 samples were analysed in total (45 cases and 45 controls). A factorial analysis of variance (using age as a fixed factor) demonstrated a number of differences in inflammatory cytokines. There were 28 significantly different analytes in total. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor was the most significantly different analyte (p<0.001). Many of the significant analytes were chemokine ligands found to be linked through an inflammatory pathway promoting T-cell and granulocyte production and activation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results add further weight to the hypothesis that cancer-related fatigue syndrome is associated with an increased pro-inflammatory immune response. Our findings indicate that these cytokine changes could underpin the subjective symptoms, such as perceived muscle weakness and concentration difficulties, experienced by women who feel fatigued after treatment.

Type: Article
Title: Multi-analyte profiling and pathway analysis of plasma for proteins associated with cancer-related fatigue syndrome in disease-free breast cancer patients after primary treatment.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjspcare-2013-000452
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2013-000452
Language: English
Additional information: This article has been accepted for publication in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care following peer review. The definitive copyedited, typeset version Minton, O; Coulton, GR; Stone, P; (2014) Multi-analyte profiling and pathway analysis of plasma for proteins associated with cancer-related fatigue syndrome in disease-free breast cancer patients after primary treatment. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , 4 (4) pp. 349-356, is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1136/bmjspcare-2013-000452.
Keywords: Survivorship, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biomarkers, Blood Proteins, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Cytokines, Disease-Free Survival, Fatigue, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Syndrome
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1432752
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