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Tissue Engineering in Dentistry.

Neel, EA; Chrzanowski, W; Salih, VM; Kim, HW; Knowles, JC; (2014) Tissue Engineering in Dentistry. J Dent , 42 (8) pp. 915-928. 10.1016/j.jdent.2014.05.008. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. Data The authors used “PUBMED” to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., “tissue engineering”, “approaches”, “strategies” “dentistry”, “dental stem cells”, “dentino-pulp complex”, “guided tissue regeneration”, “whole tooth”, “TMJ”, “condyle”, “salivary glands”, and “oral mucosa”. Sources Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Study selection Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. Conclusions There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Clinical Significance Considering the interests of the patients who could possibly be helped by applying stem cell-based therapies should be carefully assessed against current ethical concerns regarding the moral status of the early embryo.

Type: Article
Title: Tissue Engineering in Dentistry.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jdent.2014.05.008
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2014.05.008
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.
Keywords: bioengineered teeth, biomimetic scaffolds, dentin-pulp complex, tissue engineering strategies
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Biomaterials and Tissue Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1431221
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