UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Pain management for chronic musculoskeletal conditions: the development of an evidence-based and theory-informed pain self-management course

Carnes, D; Homer, K; Underwood, M; Pincus, T; Rahman, A; Taylor, SJC; (2013) Pain management for chronic musculoskeletal conditions: the development of an evidence-based and theory-informed pain self-management course. BMJ OPEN , 3 (11) , Article e003534. 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003534. Green open access

[thumbnail of BMJ_Open-2013-Carnes-.pdf]
Preview
PDF
BMJ_Open-2013-Carnes-.pdf

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Objective: To devise and test a self-management course for chronic pain patients based on evidence and underpinned by theory using the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing complex interventions. Design: We used a mixed method approach. We conducted a systematic review of the effectiveness of components and characteristics of pain management courses. We then interviewed chronic pain patients who had attended pain and self-management courses. Behavioural change theories were mapped onto our findings and used to design the intervention. We then conducted a feasibility study to test the intervention. Setting: Primary care in the inner city of London, UK. Participants Adults (18 years or older) with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Outcomes: Related disability, quality of life, coping, depression, anxiety, social integration and healthcare resource use. Results: The systematic reviews indicated that group-based courses with joint lay and healthcare professional leadership and that included a psychological component of short duration (<8 weeks) showed considerable promise. The qualitative research indicated that participants liked relaxation, valued social interaction and course location, and that timing and good tutoring were important determinants of attendance. We used behavioural change theories (social learning theory and cognitive behaviour approaches (CBA)) to inform course content. The course addressed: understanding and accepting pain, mood and pain, unhelpful thoughts and behaviour, problem solving, goal setting, action planning, movement, relaxation and social integration/reactivation. Attendance was 85%; we modified the recruitment of patients, the course and the training of facilitators as a result of testing. Conclusions: The MRC guidelines were helpful in developing this intervention. It was possible to train both lay and non-psychologists to facilitate the courses and deliver CBA. The course was feasible and well received.

Type: Article
Title: Pain management for chronic musculoskeletal conditions: the development of an evidence-based and theory-informed pain self-management course
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003534
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003534
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Keywords: PAIN MANAGEMENT, PRIMARY CARE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1423301
Downloads since deposit
185Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item