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Characterization of long-term users of nicotine replacement therapy: evidence from a national survey

Silla, K; Beard, E; Shahab, L; (2014) Characterization of long-term users of nicotine replacement therapy: evidence from a national survey. Nicotine and Tobacco Research , 16 (8) 1050 - 1055. 10.1093/ntr/ntu019. Green open access

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Abstract

Introduction: Harm reduction involving partial or complete substitution of cigarettes with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is likely to benefit smokers by reducing exposure to carcinogens and by increasing the likelihood of permanent cessation. This article aimed to assess the determinants of short- and long-term NRT use for harm reduction in order to inform interventions aimed at helping smokers struggling to quit to switch to complete NRT substitution. / Methods: Data were used from the Smoking Toolkit Study, a population-based survey of adults in England aged 16 years and older (n = 9,224). Participants were asked about their sociodemographic characteristics and tobacco use. Attitudes toward smoking were also assessed using questions covering 4 factors: motives, identity, evaluations, and plans. / Results: Concurrent short-term (<3 months) and long-term (≥3 months) NRT use was uncommon among smokers at 10.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.1–11.4) and 5.0% (95% CI = 4.6–5.4), respectively. Long-term NRT users had higher odds of being older, in nonmanual occupations, and more addicted than smokers with short-term or no NRT use (all p < .01). They reported lower odds of attempting to stop and higher odds of exhibiting a positive smoker identity than short-term users (p < .001). Conversely, long-term NRT users had higher odds of having made a recent quit attempt, to have plans to stop, and lower odds of a positive smoker identity than smokers not using NRT (all p < .001). / Conclusions: While users of NRT for harm-reduction purposes are a heterogeneous group, it appears they are more critical of smoking than never users and tend to positively modulate their behavior, setting them on a path toward cessation.

Type: Article
Title: Characterization of long-term users of nicotine replacement therapy: evidence from a national survey
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntu019
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu019
Language: English
Additional information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Nicotine and Tobacco Research following peer review. The version of record, Silla, K; Beard, E; Shahab, L; (2014) Characterization of long-term users of nicotine replacement therapy: evidence from a national survey. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 16 (8) 1050 - 1055, is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu019.
Keywords: Adult, England, Female, Harm Reduction, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Nicotine, Nicotinic Agonists, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Tobacco Use Cessation Products, Tobacco Use Disorder
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1421873
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