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Developing an optimisation-driven hydro-economic simulator for improved water resources management in the Eastern Nile Basin using the ε-constraint approach

Eshwihdi, AAA; (2013) Developing an optimisation-driven hydro-economic simulator for improved water resources management in the Eastern Nile Basin using the ε-constraint approach. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

The Eastern Nile region has been identified as a promising area for large new water development projects. To assist in assessing new investments, primarily new reservoirs, a mathematically-based computer model called ENMOS (Eastern Nile Multipurpose Option Scoping) was developed by Nile stakeholders. ENMOS is an optimisation-driven hydro-economic simulator. In its present version it has several limitations, however. This thesis proposes an enhanced version, ENMOS2, which, unlike the original, can be run over an extended time span and which covers an enlarged water network. ENMOS2 improves the basic problem-solving method so that it can deal with multi-objective problems and work with perfect foresight. This not only ensures greater efficiency, but enables the model to incorporate economic agricultural modelling and to calculate evaporation levels at reservoirs more realistically. This in turn creates considerable water usage efficiencies and maximises profits from crop yields. Against set aims, different versions of the new model were tested and compared to ascertain their effectiveness. In the trials, it was found that application of the ε-constraint method delivered not only Pareto optimal solutions with a richer range of results, but the greatest level of efficiencies. Full conclusions are reached at the end of this thesis, showing the eventual efficiencies achieved.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Developing an optimisation-driven hydro-economic simulator for improved water resources management in the Eastern Nile Basin using the ε-constraint approach
Language: English
Additional information: Permission for digitisation not received.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1415699
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