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Associations between arterial oxygen saturation, body size and limb measurements among high-altitude Andean children

Pomeroy, E; Stock, JT; Stanojevic, S; Miranda, JJ; Cole, TJ; Wells, JCK; (2013) Associations between arterial oxygen saturation, body size and limb measurements among high-altitude Andean children. American Journal of Human Biology , 25 (5) 629 - 636. 10.1002/ajhb.22422. Green open access

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Abstract

ABSTRACT: Objectives: The relative influences of hypoxia and other environmental stressors on growth at altitude remain unclear. Previous work demonstrated an association between peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and anthropometry (especially tibia length) among Tibetan and Han children at altitude. We investigated whether similar associations exist among Andeans, and the patterning of associations between SpO2 and anthropometry. Methods: Stature, head-trunk height, total upper and lower limb lengths, zeugopod (ulna and tibia) and autopod (hand and foot) lengths were measured in Peruvian children (0.5–14 years) living at >3000 m altitude. SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. Anthropometry was converted to internal z scores. Correlation and multiple regression were used to examine associations between anthropometry z scores and SpO2, altitude, or SpO2 adjusted for altitude since altitude is a major determinant of variation in SpO2. Results: SpO2 and altitude show weak, significant correlations with zeugopod length z scores and still weaker significant correlations with total upper and lower limb length z scores. Correlations with z scores for stature, head-trunk height, or autopod lengths are not significant. Adjusted for altitude, there is no significant association between anthropometry and SpO2. Conclusions: Associations between SpO2 or altitude and total limb and zeugopod length z scores exist among Andean children. However, the relationships are relatively weak, and while the relationship between anthropometry and altitude may be partly mediated by SpO2, other factors that covary with altitude (e.g., socioeconomic status, health) are likely to influence anthropometry. The results support suggestions that zeugopod lengths are particularly sensitive to environmental stressors.

Type: Article
Title: Associations between arterial oxygen saturation, body size and limb measurements among high-altitude Andean children
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/ajhb.22422
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22422
Language: English
Additional information: © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Wiley Open Access is a publishing program designed to drive quality, peer -reviewed publishing with speed and efficiency through open access publication. PubMed ID: 23904412
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1411551
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