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Hacking Design: Novelty and Diachronic Emergence

Ireland, TG; Zaroukas, E; (2012) Hacking Design: Novelty and Diachronic Emergence. Architectural Theory Review , 17 (1) 140 - 157. 10.1080/13264826.2012.666984. Green open access

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Abstract

The concept of emergence has had a significant effect on architectural theory instigating a paradigmatic change in design, affecting the way a building is perceived. In practice the practicalities of procuring a building that satisfies necessities, renders engagement with the concept largely academic. Otherwise, the physical properties of a building tend to limit engagement with emergence at the synchronic level. In this paper we consider how we might engage with the creative capacity of emergence at the diachronic level. As an artificial system a building may be perceived at different scales. Through computation we can conceive a systemic whole, which we may hack to explore the spatio-temporal capacities of the system, bending and leveraging behaviour in order to discover new tendencies of space and form.

Type: Article
Title: Hacking Design: Novelty and Diachronic Emergence
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/13264826.2012.666984
Publisher version: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1326482...
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Architectural Theory Review 2012 Vol. 17, Issue 1 Special Issue: Emergence and Architecture © Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13264826.2012.666984
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1410124
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