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Rethinking Productivity: Why has Productivity Focussed on Labour Instead of Natural Resources?

Bleischwitz, R; (2001) Rethinking Productivity: Why has Productivity Focussed on Labour Instead of Natural Resources? Environmental and Resource Economics , 19 (1) 23 - 36. 10.1023/A:1011106527578. Green open access

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Abstract

The contribution of natural resources and ecosystems to economic processes still remains under-assessed by market evaluation and productivity analysis. Following the historical lines of the classical productivity debate ranging from the French Physiocrats to early neoclassical growth theories, the productivity concept underwent a gradual transformation from its previous understanding based on natural resources and other environmental factors to its contemporary narrow notion. This paper claims that the course of the classical debate has shaped the scope of predominant contemporary analysis. Except for some very recent findings, multifactor productivity largely focusses on a two-factor model. Material Flow Analysis (MFA) provides a useful step for widening the measurement and notion of productivity.

Type: Article
Title: Rethinking Productivity: Why has Productivity Focussed on Labour Instead of Natural Resources?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1023/A:1011106527578
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1011106527578
Language: English
Additional information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1011106527578.
Keywords: material flow analysis, measurement, natural resources, productivity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1407320
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