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Visualising politeness and patriotism: the public sphere in English satirical prints, 1745-84.

Thom, DJE; (2013) Visualising politeness and patriotism: the public sphere in English satirical prints, 1745-84. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This thesis analyses the relationship between polite and patriotic discourses, their critical development in satirical imagery, and the place of these concepts within the Habermasian public sphere 1745-84. In exploring the polyvalent nature of ‘politeness’ and ‘patriotism’ in this period, I undermine the implicitly simple dichotomy between these strands of social discourse, by considering their function as essential components of the public sphere and public identity. Satirical prints, being simultaneously a cultural product of the public sphere and a means of critiquing the culture of that sphere, are an important source for understanding the relationship between the social public sphere and public discourse, not only in a heuristic sense, but as a result of an entrenched system of shared codes and signs, which allowed the exchange of didactic, polemical and/or humorous messages between different public media. The ability of an image to convey the subtleties and ambiguities of an idea, in a way that written text cannot, makes satirical prints in particular a useful tool for understanding the complexities of politeness and of patriotism. By approaching public discourse through the medium of satirical prints, I explore the contradiction inherent in the production of images that critique and comment upon the commercial public sphere, while acknowledged as commodities in themselves.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Visualising politeness and patriotism: the public sphere in English satirical prints, 1745-84.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Keywords: London, Satire, print, eighteenth century, Hogarth, public sphere
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of History of Art
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1401155
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