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Characteristics of 5-year-olds who catch-up with MMR: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study

Pearce, A; Mindlin, M; Cortina-Borja, M; Bedford, H; (2013) Characteristics of 5-year-olds who catch-up with MMR: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. BMJ Open , 3 (7) , Article 003152. 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003152. Green open access

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Abstract

To examine predictors of partial and full measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination catch-up between 3 and 5 years. Design: Secondary data analysis of the nationally representative Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). Setting: Children born in the UK, 2000–2002. Participants: 751 MCS children who were unimmunised against MMR at age 3, with immunisation information at age 5. Main outcome measures: Catch-up status: unimmunised (received no MMR), partial catch-up (received one MMR) or full catch-up (received two MMRs). Results: At age 5, 60.3% (n=440) children remained unvaccinated, 16.1% (n=127) had partially and 23.6% (n=184) had fully caught-up. Children from families who did not speak English at home were five times as likely to partially catch-up than children living in homes where only English was spoken (risk ratio 4.68 (95% CI 3.63 to 6.03)). Full catch-up was also significantly more likely in those did not speak English at home (adjusted risk ratio 1.90 (1.08 to 3.32)). In addition, those from Pakistan/ Bangladesh (2.40 (1.38 to 4.18)) or ‘other’ ethnicities (such as Chinese) (1.88 (1.08 to 3.29)) were more likely to fully catch-up than White British. Those living in socially rented (1.86 (1.34 to 2.56)) or ‘Other’ (2.52 (1.23 to 5.18)) accommodations were more likely to fully catch-up than home owners, and families were more likely to catch-up if they lived outside London (1.95 (1.32 to 2.89)). Full catch-up was less likely if parents reported medical reasons (0.43 (0.25 to 0.74)), a conscious decision (0.33 (0.23 to 0.48)), or ‘other’ reasons (0.46 (0.29 to 0.73)) for not immunising at age 3 (compared with ‘practical’ reasons). Conclusions: Parents who partially or fully catch-up with MMR experience practical barriers and tend to come from disadvantaged or ethnic minority groups. Families who continue to reject MMR tend to have more advantaged backgrounds and make a conscious decision to not immunise early on. Health professionals should consider these findings in light of the characteristics of their local populations.

Type: Article
Title: Characteristics of 5-year-olds who catch-up with MMR: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003152
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003152
Language: English
Additional information: © 2013 by the BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. All rights reserved. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ PMCID: PMC3717465
Keywords: Socio-economic factors, Child health services, Immunisation, Measles, Measles-mumps-rubella vaccine
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1400830
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