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Association between smoking cessation and short-term health-care use: results from an international prospective cohort study (ATTEMPT)

Beard, E; Shahab, L; Curry, SJ; West, R; (2013) Association between smoking cessation and short-term health-care use: results from an international prospective cohort study (ATTEMPT). Addiction , 108 (11) pp. 1979-1988. 10.1111/add.12281. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have found that smoking cessation is associated with a short-term increase in health-care use. This may be because 'sicker' smokers are more likely to stop smoking. The current study assessed the association between smoking cessation and health-care use, adjusting for pre-cessation physical and mental health conditions. DESIGN/SETTING: Data came from the ATTEMPT cohort, a multi-national prospective survey of smokers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France and Spain, that lasted 18 months (with follow-ups every 3 months). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 3645 smokers completed the baseline questionnaire. All participants smoked at least five cigarettes per day, intended to quit smoking within the next 3 months and were between 35 and 65 years of age. MEASUREMENTS: Participants were asked questions about their socio-demographic and smoking characteristics, as well previous smoking-related morbidities. Participants were also asked to report their health-care use in the previous 3 months i.e. emergency room (ER) visits, hospitalization, whether hospitalization required surgery, and health-care appointments. FINDINGS: A total of 8252, 4779 and 1954 baseline episodes of smoking were available for 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Of these, 2.8% (n = 230), 0.9% (n = 40) and 0.7% (n = 14) were followed by 3, 6 and 12 months of abstinence. No significant differences were found among 3, 6 or 12 months of abstinence and ER visits, hospitalization and whether hospitalization required surgery or health-care visits. However, 6-month smoking cessation episodes were associated with higher odds of reporting an appointment with a dietician. CONCLUSION: Smoking cessation does not appear to be associated with a substantial short-term increase or decrease in health-care use after adjusting for pre-cessation morbidities.

Type: Article
Title: Association between smoking cessation and short-term health-care use: results from an international prospective cohort study (ATTEMPT)
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/add.12281
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.12281
Language: English
Additional information: © 2013 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Cigarettes, cost-benefit analysis, health-care costs, health-care use, hospitalization, smoking cessation, Adult, Aged, Appointments and Schedules, Canada, Emergency Medical Services, France, Great Britain, Hospitalization, Humans, Middle Aged, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Prospective Studies, Self Report, Smoking Cessation, Spain, United States
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1398174
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